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support@mvfhsi.com
Inayagan, Naga City, Cebu, Philippines

Celebrating a Life

Personalizing a Celebration

Ang tumong sa paglubong dili lang aron ihatod ang namatay ngadto sa iyang katapusang pahuwayanan, kondili ingon man usab ang paghatag ug higayon sa mga kadugo ug mga kahigalaan sa pagsaulog ug paghandom sa iyang kinabuhi. Yes, the purpose of a funeral is also to provide a way of commemorating the life of the deceased and to bring together friends and family. At Mt. View, we aim for our celebrations to be a time to share memories and remember your loved one through music, stories, and capturing the nature of their spirit.

The most important thing to keep in mind when creating a celebration is that it should be reflective of your dear-departed loved one. While religious practices may play a part, it should also include stories about the person’s life that help everyone recapture and revisit their own memories. Sometimes this is best accomplished by having friends or family members share their reflections as part of the service. Some people personalize the service with special music (which may be religious or non-religious). Others bring in pictures to have at the service. Sometimes favorite things that belonged to the deceased are integrated into the ceremony such as wood carvings, or even a motorcycle. Usahay, pwede pud nga iapil sa service ang iyang paboritong hiniktan, or ilimnon.

The goal is to give a true sense of who this person was. There is nothing wrong with telling funny stories about the person who died: a funeral recognizes the sad event of a death, but can include humor. Unique celebrations include a backyard, or house dance party if the loved one was an avid dancer, or some offering of a unique food he used to cook, etc.

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How to honor a life

After someone dies, the people left behind are tasked with carrying on with their lives.
This can be particularly difficult if the individual was a family member or a close friend, but it must be done. No matter what your religious beliefs (or lack thereof), grieving after a loss is healthy and completely necessary.

Though a loved one may be gone, you can keep their memory and legacy alive by honoring them in one of more of these ways:

Light a candle. You can do this at church and say a prayer, or do it at home and feel the warmth of their memory.
Hold a memorial service or candlelight vigil.
Finish any projects they were working on.
Bring flowers to their grave and keep the area well-tended.
Make a scrapbook of their life.
Reach out to family and friends who are also grieving and share stories about the departed.
Plant a tree or have one planted in their honor.
Volunteer for their favorite causes, or give a donation in their name.
Hold a charity drive in their name for food, toys or something to help others.
Remember them during life events like weddings, anniversaries, and holidays.
Live your life in a way that would make them proud. Finish (or go back to) school, have adventures, and be happy. It’s what they would have wanted for you.

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Dealing with Grief

Remember, grief isn’t a race to see who can bounce back and recover the soonest. It takes time. Don’t rush yourself to feel better again. Also remember that not every suggestion in the world is going to resonate with you. Don’t continue pursuing a strategy that remains ineffective just because thought leaders and experts say it works wonders. If it’s not restorative in any way and you see no benefit, then it’s time to move on to a new method.

Transfer your emotions into an activity.

Whether it’s a hobby that’s been dormant for some time, a new activity altogether, or even something you used to share with your loved one—transferring your emotions into an activity is a great way to detox yourself from stress and other disempowering emotions.

Surround yourself with their love.

Cover your bed’s headboard with their pictures. Wear their shirts and sweaters and hats. Put a memento they loved on your nightstand. Wallpaper an area in your home with the greeting cards you exchanged. They may not be physically present any longer, but it’s okay to cherish what they meant to you and surround yourself with the wonderful time you shared together.

How to honor a life

After someone dies, the people left behind are tasked with carrying on with their lives.
This can be particularly difficult if the individual was a family member or a close friend, but it must be done. No matter what your religious beliefs (or lack thereof), grieving after a loss is healthy and completely necessary.

Though a loved one may be gone, you can keep their memory and legacy alive by honoring them in one of more of these ways:

  • Light a candle. You can do this at church and say a prayer, or do it at home and feel the warmth of their memory.
  • Hold a memorial service or candlelight vigil.
  • Finish any projects they were working on.
  • Bring flowers to their grave and keep the area well-tended.
  • Make a scrapbook of their life.
  • Reach out to family and friends who are also grieving and share stories about the departed.
  • Plant a tree or have one planted in their honor.
  • Volunteer for their favorite causes, or give a donation in their name.
  • Hold a charity drive in their name for food, toys or something to help others.
  • Remember them during life events like weddings, anniversaries, and holidays.
  • Live your life in a way that would make them proud. Finish (or go back to) school, have adventures, and be happy. It’s what they would have wanted for you.

Remember, grief isn’t a race to see who can bounce back and recover the soonest. It takes time. Don’t rush yourself to feel better again. Also remember that not every suggestion in the world is going to resonate with you. Don’t continue pursuing a strategy that remains ineffective just because thought leaders and experts say it works wonders. If it’s not restorative in any way and you see no benefit, then it’s time to move on to a new method.

Whether it’s a hobby that’s been dormant for some time, a new activity altogether, or even something you used to share with your loved one—transferring your emotions into an activity is a great way to detox yourself from stress and other disempowering emotions.

Cover your bed’s headboard with their pictures. Wear their shirts and sweaters and hats. Put a memento they loved on your nightstand. Wallpaper an area in your home with the greeting cards you exchanged. They may not be physically present any longer, but it’s okay to cherish what they meant to you and surround yourself with the wonderful time you shared together.